Police accuse Netanyahu and J’lem District head of secret deal

Senior police officials have accused Jerusalem Police head Asst.-Ch. Yoram Halevy of holding secret talks with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, with an eye to affecting the outcome of the investigations of the prime minister and helping to promote Halevy as the next commissioner of the Israel Police, Channel 2 reported on Thursday.

In response, other senior police officers claim that associates of incumbent commissioner Insp.-Gen. Roni Alsheich are behind an attempt to thwart Halevy’s candidacy to head the force.

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The Prime Minister’s Office denied the Channel 2 report as a “total lie” and senior police officials told Channel 2 News: “Like in the Harpaz Affair [regarding the selection of the IDF chief of staff several years ago], the commander of the organization is trying to topple a potential successor via lies…”

“He is trying to prepare himself for a fourth year in office,” they were quoted as saying.

The police spokesman said in a statement: “The Israel Police rejects the claims of confrontations and any other statements regarding the nature of relationships with senior police officers. The police commissioner has led many reforms in the police force together and in full cooperation with the entire senior command staff.

“The police commissioner will continue to work together with Asst.-Ch. Yoram Halevy to maintain a normal routine for the residents of Jerusalem and the surrounding area. Again we are witnessing disinformation that was supposedly in the name of the police commissioner or ‘his associates.’”

MK Revital Swid said in response to the report: “Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan must announce his recommendation to extend the term of Police Commissioner Alsheich and calm the system. It is inconceivable that, at this time, there will be friction and confrontation at the top level of the police force,” she said.

“It is Erdan’s duty and responsibility to ensure quiet and to stand by the police in the face of evil intentions, and there is no shortage of them,” Swid said.